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Songs from Plays :

A Morning Song for Imogen (from Cymbeline)

462

Silvia (from The Two Gentlemen of Verona)

462

Sigh no more, Ladies (from Much Ado about Nothing)

463

A Lover's Lament (from Twelfth Night)

463

Ariel's Song (from The Tempest)

464

A Sea Dirge (from The Tempest)

464

In the Greenwood (from As You Like It)

465

Winter (from Love's Labour's Lost) .

465

Song of Autolycus (from The Winter's Tale)

466

SAMÚEL DANIEL (1562-1619)

G. Saintsbury 467

Sonnet to Delia

469

Extracts from The History of the Civil War :

The Death of Talbot

469

To the Lady Margaret, Countess of Cumberland

471

Extract from Hymen's Triumph

473

RICHARD BARNFIELD (1574-1627) ·

The Editor 474

Sonnet from Cynthia

Extracts from Poems in Divers Humors :

Sonnet to his friend Maister R. L.

476

An Ode

477

ROBERT SOUTHWELL (1562?-1594)

Prof. Hales 479

Times go by Turns

482

Loss in Delay

482

The Burning Babe

484

Extract from St. Peter's Complaint

484

Sir WALTER RALEIGH (1552–1618)

Prof. Hales 486

A Vision upon this Conceit of The Fairy Queen

489

Reply to Marlowe's 'The Passionate Shepherd to His Love'

489

The Lie

490

His Pilgrimage

492

Verses found in his Bible at the Gate-House at Westminster

494

ELIZABETHAN MISCELLANIES

The Editor 495

From The Paradyse of Dainty Devises :

Amantium Irae (R. Edwards)

From A Handefull of Pleasant Delites :

A Proper Sonnet (Anon.)

498

.From The Arbor of Amorous Devises :

A Sweet Lullaby (Anon.)

500

From England's Helicon :

A Palinode (Edmund Bolton)

Phillida and Corydon (Nicolas Breton)

502

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Mary A. Ward 548.

Extracts from Nosce Teipsum :

The Soul compared to a River

551

The Soul compared to a Virgin wooed in Marriage

552

Extract from Orchestra, or A Poeme of Dauncing:

11G

Antinvas praises dancing before Queen Penelope

55'

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INTRODUCTION.

“The future of poetry is immense, because in poetry, where it is worthy of its high destinies, our race, as time goes on, will find an ever surer and surer stay. There is not a creed which is not shaken, not an accredited dogma which is not shown to be questionable, not a received tradition which does not threaten to dissolve. Our religion has materialised itself in the fact, in the supposed fact; it has attached its emotion to the fact, and now the fact is failing it.

But for poetry the idea is everything; the rest is a world of illusion, of divine illusion. Poetry attaches its emotion to the idea; the idea is the fact. The strongest part of our religion to-day is its unconscious poetry.'

Let me be permitted to quote these words of my own, as uttering the thought which should, in my opinion, go with us and govern us in all our study of poetry. In the present work it is the course of one great contributory stream to the world-river of poetry that we are invited to follow. here invited to trace the stream of English poetry. But whether we set ourselves, as here, to follow only one of the several streams that make the mighty river of poetry, or whether we seek to know them all, our governing thought should be the same. We should conceive of poetry worthily, and more highly than it has been the custom to conceive of it. We should conceive of it as capable of higher uses, and VOL. I.

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