The American in Paris During the Summer: Being a Companion to the "Winter in Paris;" Or, Heath's Picturesque Annual for 1844

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1844 - 247 páginas
 

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Página 49 - It defended itself as bravely as possible, from all the rebels against authority, which the end of the seventeenth, and the whole of the eighteenth century, produced. It defended, step by step, the moral dominion which the Romish church had confided to it ; and when at last it was compelled to give way, it did so honorably, after having stood alone against all, alone against Voltaire, alone against the whole Encyclopaedia. What do we say ? It had stood alone against M.
Página 118 - ... the cavaliers from a distance. This is the reason why so many await their arrival — why the anxiety is so general. " After an hour of this delightful expectation, do you not at last see in the distance, through the weeping willows, through the white branches of the poplars in the meadow— do you not see coming a light red or blue mist ? " Yes ! here they are ; it is they ; it is the racers of the day ; all gentlemen riders ! they have already, in five minutes, shot over a league and a half...
Página 118 - Couronne road, and full of water ; the ascent to it is perpendicular, then, when you have reached the top of the acclivity, you must leap downwards across a formidable ravine, so much the more dangerous, because it is impossible for the horses to discover it.
Página 169 - Fontainebleau now repaired and saved, every thing is revived : the tottering foundations are again settled, the staircases crushed by so many passing grandeurs are re-established upon their bases, the statues lying upon the ground again ascend their pedestals, the portraits return into their frames, the old plaster of the saloons is driven away like dust, and behind this ignoble coat re-appear, in their new brilliancy, the chefs d'ceuvre of three centuries. It is done ; the restoration of the monument...
Página 3 - ... far, Is hollowed out, and the moon dips her horn, And twinkles many a star. Inverted in the tide, Stand the gray rocks, and trembling shadows throw; And the fair trees look over, side by side, And see themselves below. Sweet April !— many a thought Is wedded unto thee, as hearts are wed ; Nor shall they fail, till, to its autumn brought, Life's golden fruit is shed.
Página 118 - Couronni, near the Croix de Berny. Each one takes the best position he can find, upon the road, at the side of the stream in the meadow, or in the garden of the pretty little house on the right — a fruitful garden on such a day, for it brings to its master as much as an estate of two hundred acres in Normandy. You would not know how to believe the drama which passes at this hour on the high road. The general excitement is intense ; the betting is at its height — those hazardous bets eight to...
Página vii - ... yellow leaves. A traveller without affectation, he asked nothing more than to take his part in the sweet joys, lively emotions, and noisy pleasures of this world of the powerful and the rich ; he endured as well as he could the intoxications and the delirium of the masked ball ; the thousand cross-fires of Parisian conversation ; the paradoxes, the slanders, and even the innocent calumnies that he saw around him ; he entered into all ; he wished to see every thing, and he fulfilled his wish....
Página vii - Janin'a preface is written with the intention of being believed. He says : " Our American appears before you once more. Last year, at the same period, he described to you, in the best way he could, Parisian life during the brilliant months of winter. He had then arrived at the great city, at the very moment when the closing days of autumn were disappearing beneath the yellow leaves. A traveller without affectation, he asked nothing more than to take his part in the sweet joys, lively emotions, and...
Página 118 - In this agitated crowd, more than one lady's heart secretly palpitates, so heavy is the stake now, a stake in which the heart takes so deep an interest ! The moment is well chosen for this headlong race, the sun is brilliant and yet moderate, the air is clear and transparent; you will certainly be able to see the cavaliers from a distance. This is the reason why so many await their arrival, why the anxiety is so general. After an hour of this delightful expectation, do you not at last see in...
Página 117 - Thus we arrive breathless upon the spot, between two ditches, between two flowing streams, between two meadows, which are still wet on the course of the Bœiiff Couronné, near the Croix de Berny.

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