The Vale Shakespeare, Volume 28

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Hacon & Ricketts, 1902

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Palavras e frases frequentes

Passagens conhecidas

Página xxxii - Go to your bosom ; Knock there ; and ask your heart what it doth know That's like my brother's fault ; if it confess A natural guiltiness such as is his, Let it not sound a thought upon your tongue Against my brother's life.
Página xx - We must not make a scare-crow of the law, ' Setting it up to fear the birds of prey, And let it keep one shape, till custom make it Their perch, and not their terror.
Página xliv - If I must die, I will encounter darkness as a bride, And hug it in mine arms.
Página xxx - Alas! alas! Why, all the souls that were were forfeit once; And He that might the vantage best have took Found out the remedy.
Página xlvi - Ay, but to die, and go we know not where; To lie in cold obstruction and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling region of thick-ribbed ice; To be imprison'd in the viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world; or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine howling:— 'tis too horrible!
Página xxxi - But man, proud man ! Drest in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he's most assured, His glassy essence, like an angry ape, Plays such fantastic tricks before high Heaven As make the angels weep ; who, with our spleens, Would all themselves laugh mortal.
Página xci - They say, best men are moulded out of faults ; And, for the most, become much more the better For being a little bad : so may my husband.
Página lvii - He who the sword of heaven will bear Should be as holy as severe ; Pattern in himself, to know, Grace to stand, and virtue go ; More nor less to others paying, Than by self-offences weighing.
Página xliii - ... sleep, Dreaming on both; for all thy blessed youth Becomes as aged, and doth beg the alms Of palsied eld; and when thou art old and rich, Thou hast neither heat, affection, limb, nor beauty, To make thy riches pleasant. What's yet in this That bears the name of life? Yet in this life Lie hid more thousand deaths; yet death we fear, That makes these odds all even.
Página xviii - Our doubts are traitors, And make us lose the good we oft might win, By fearing to attempt...

Informação bibliográfica