The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon Including All His Occasional Works: Namely Letters, Speeches, Tracts, State Papers, Memorials, Devices and All Authentic Writings Not Already Printed Among His Philosophical, Literary, Or Professional Works, Volume 7

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Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts, 1874

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Página 539 - For my name and memory, I leave it to men's charitable speeches, and to foreign nations, and to the next age.
Página 574 - No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion.
Página 574 - For whilst, to the shame of slow-endeavouring art, Thy easy numbers flow, and that each heart • Hath, from the leaves of thy unvalued book, Those Delphic lines with deep impression took, Then thou, our fancy of itself bereaving, Dost make us marble, with too much conceiving ; And, so sepulchred in such pomp dost lie, That kings for such a tomb would wish to die.
Página 230 - Besides my innumerable sins, I confess before thee, that I am debtor to thee for the gracious talent of thy gifts and graces, which I have neither put into a napkin, nor put it, as I ought, to exchangers, where it might have made best profit, but...
Página 252 - Upon advised consideration of the charges," said he, " descending into my own conscience, and calling my memory to account so far as I am able, I do plainly and ingenuously confess that I am guilty of corruption, and do renounce all defence.
Página 235 - There be three degrees or cases of bribery, charged or supposed in a judge : The first, of bargain or contract, for reward to pervert justice. The second, where the judge conceives the cause to be at an end, by the information of the party, or otherwise, and useth not such diligence as he ought to inquire of it. And the third, when the cause is really ended, and it is sine fraude, without relation to any precedent promise.
Página 280 - Good my Lord, Procure the warrant for my discharge this day. Death, I thank God, is so far from being unwelcome to me, as I have called for it (as Christian- resolution would permit) any time these two months. But to die before the time of his majesty's grace, and in this disgraceful place, is even the worst that could be...
Página 216 - And lastly, That if there be any more petitions of like nature, that your lordships would be pleased not to take any prejudice or apprehension of any number or muster of them, especially against a judge, that makes two thousand...
Página 520 - That he shall never sit in Parliament, nor come within the verge of the Court.
Página 120 - The work, in what colours soever it may be set forth, is no more but a new logic, teaching to invent and judge by induction, as finding syllogism incompetent for sciences of nature ; and thereby to make philosophy and sciences both more true and more active.

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