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926 1 Plain truth; or serious considerations on the present state of the city

of Philadelphia. 1747. 1014 2 Priestley's essay on the first principles of government, and the nature

of political, civil and religious liberty ; including remarks on Dr. Brown's code of education, and on Dr. Balguy's sermon on church

authority. 2d edit. London, 1771.

3 An essay on the constitution of England. 2d edit. London, 1766. 1061 1 Thoughts on the late transactions respecting Falkland's islands. 2d

edit. London, 1771. 2 The false alarm. London, 1770. 3 Thoughts on the cause of the present discontents. 4th edit. Lon

don, 1770. 4 Macauley's observations on a pamphlet, entitled, “ Thoughts on the

cause of the present discontents.” 5th edit. London, 1770. 1064 | The rights of the colonies examined. Providence, 1765.

2 A letter from a gentleman at Halifax, to his friend in Rhode Island ;

containing remarks on a pamphlet, entitled, “ The rights of the colo

nies examined.” Newport, 1765. 3 A defence of the letter from a gentleman at Halifax, to his friend in

Rhode Island. Newport, 1765. 1106 3 Price's appeal to the public on the subject of the national debt. 2d.

edit. London, 1772. 3 Dickinson's reply to a piece called “ The speech of Joseph Galloway,

Esq." Philadelphia, 1764. 1135 I Common sense; addressed to the inhabitants of America. Philadel.

phia, 1776. 2. Plain truth ; addressed to the inhabitants of America ; containing re.

marks on a late pamphlet, entitled, “Common sense.". Philadel

phia, 1776. 3 Rationalis. 4 Remarks on a late pamphlet, entitled, “ Plain truth.” Philad. 1776. 5 The true interest of America impartially stated, in certain strictures

on a pamphlet, entitled, “ Common sense." Philadelphia, 1776. 6 An address from congress to the inhabitants of Quebec. 7 Additions to “ Plain truth," in answer to “Common sense.” Phila.

delphia, 1776. 1 The pamphlet, entitled, “ Taxation no tyranny," candidly considered.

London. 2 Taxation, tyranny. Addressed to Samuel Johnson. London, 1775. 3 Tyranny unmasked. An answer to a late pamphlet entitled, “ Taxa

tion no tyranny.” London, 1775. 5 Witherspoon's address to the natives of Scotland, residing in America.

Philadelphia, 1776. 7 An address to the protestant dissenters of all denominations, on the

approaching election of members of parliament. London, 1774. 8 The speech of Samuel Chew, Esq. to the grand jury of Newcastle

county, on the lawfulness of defence against an armed enemy, Phi

ladelphia, 1775. 9 An address to the inhabitants of Pennsylvania, by those freemen, of

the city of Philadelphia, who were confined in the mason's lodge, by virtue of a general warrant. Philadelphia, 1777.

1143 1 Edmund Burke's speech on American taxation. 3d edit. London,

1775. 2 An answer to Burke's speech on American taxation. London,

1775. 3 Edmund Burke's speech on moving for a conciliation with the colo

nies. 2d edit. London, 1775. I The supremacy of the British legislature over the colonies, candidly

discussed. London, 1775. 2 An address to the government, the merchants, manufacturers, and the

colonists in America, on the present state of affairs. London, 1775. 3 An appeal to the public; stating and considering the objections to the

Quebec bill. London, 1774. 4 American independence the interest and glory of Great Britain. Lon.

don, 1774. 5 Considerations on certain political transactions of the province of

South Carolina. London, 1774.

6 Appendix. 1145 i The letters of lieutenant governor Hutchinson and lieutenant gover

nor Oliver ; with the assembly's address; the proceedings and report of the lords' committee of council; and the substance of Mr.

Wedderburn's speech relating to those letters. 2d edit. Lond. 1774. 2 A letter to the earl of Chatham, on the Quebec-bill. 4th edit. 1774v 3 Lord Chatham's speech in the house of lords, on a motion for an ad

dress to the king for removing his troops from Boston. Philadel.

phia, 1775. 4 Letters to a member of parliament on the present dispute with our

American colonies. London, 1775. 5 A letter to Dr. Tucker on his proposal of a separation between Great

Britain and her American colonies. London, 1774. 6 The respective pleas and arguments of the mother country, and of

the colonies, distinctly set forth. By Doctor Tucker. Glocester,

1775. 1146, 1476 and 1481 1 The true interest of Great Britain, set forth in regard

to the colonies. By Doctor Tucker. Norfolk, 1774. 2 A friendly address to all reasonable Americans, on the subject of our

political confusions. America, 1774. 3 An abridgment of the “ Friendly address.” New York, 1774. 4 and 6 Strictures on a pamphlet, cntitled, “ A friendly address."

Philadelphia, 1774. 5 Strictures on the “ Friendly address” examined, and a refutation of its

principles attempted. New York.
✓ The poor man's advice to his neighbours, a ballad. New York, 1774.
8 An examination of the mutual claims of Great Britain and the colo-

nies; with a plan of accommodation. New York, 1775.
9 An alarm to the legislature of the province of New York.

York, 1775.
10 The origin of the American contest with Great Britain. New York,

1775. I The Americans roused, in a cure for the spleen ; being the substance

of a conversation on the times. New York.

1147 | The address of the people of Great Britain to the inhabitants of Ame

rica. London, 1775. 2 An affectionate address to the inhabitants of the British colonies in

America. 1776. 3 The sentiments of a foreigner on the disputes of Great Britain with

America. Philadelphia, 1775. 4 Great Britain's right to tax her colonies, placed in the clearest light,

by a Swiss. Philadelphia, 1775. 5 The speeches delivered in parliament, in favour of the rights of Ame

rica. New York, 1775. 6 Major-general Lee's letters to the earl Percy, and major-general

John Burgoyne; with the answers. New York, 1775. 7 The declaration of congress, setting forth the causes and necessity of

their taking up arms. Philadelphia, 1775. 8 An address from congress to the inhabitants of Great Britain. Phila

delphia, 1775. 9 An address from congress to the people of Ireland. Philad. 1775. 10 The petition and memorial of the assembly of Jamaica to the king.

Philadelphia, 1775. +236 Day's reflections on the present state of England, and the independ

ence of America 3d edit. London, 1783. 2 A memorial, addressed to the sovereigns of Europe, on the present

state of affairs, between the old and new world. London, 1780. 3 Price's state of the public debt, in 1783. 2d edit. London, 1783. 4 Sheffield's observations on the commerce of the American states ;

with an appendix. 2d edit. London, 1783. I A speech intended to have been spoken on the bill for altering the

charters of Massachusetts-bay. 3d edit. Philadelphia, 1774. 2 An essay on the constitutional power of Great Britain over America;

with the resolves of the committee of Pennsylvania, and their in.

structions to their representatives in assembly. Philad. 1774. 3 A friendly address to all reasonable Americans, on our political con.

fusions. New York, 1774. 4 Strictures on a pamphlet, entitled, “ A friendly address.” Philadel

phia, 1774. 5 Journals of the proceedings of congress, held at Philadelphia, 1774.

Philadelphia, 1774. 6 Proceedings in the parliament of Great Britain, and in Massachusetts

bay, relative to the giving of the money of the people of that province

and of all America. Philadelphia, 1774. 7 A view of the rights of British America. Philadelphia, 1774. 8 A declaration of the people's natural right to a share in the legisla.

ture. Philadelphia, 1774. 9 Considerations on the nature and extent of the legislative authority

of the British parliament. Philadelphia, 1774. 10 Quincy's observations on the Boston-port bill ; with thoughts on civil

society and standing armies. Philadelphia, 1774. This volume the

sift of Owen Biddle. 1246 1 A friendly address to all reasonable Americans, on our political con1246 2 The "friendly address” abridged. New York, 1774.

fusions. New York, 1774.

3 and 6 Strictures on a pamphlet, entitled, “ a friendly address,” Phi.

ladelphia, 1774. 4 The other side of the question; or a defence of the liberties of North

America. New York, 1774. 5 Strictures on the “friendly address” examined, and a refutation of its

principles attempted. New York. 7 Extracts from the proceedings of congress, held September 5, 1774;

with the proceedings of the Pennsylvania convention, held January

23, 1775. Philadelphia, 1775. 8 What think ye of the congress now? or an enquiry how far the Ame

ricans are bound to abide by the decisions of congress. New York,

1775. 9 A plan of a proposed union between Great Britain and the colonies. 10 Free thoughts on the proceedings of congress. 1774. 11 The congress canvassed; or an examination into the conduct of the

delegates. 1774. 12 A vindication of the measures of congress. New York, 1774. 13 A view of the controversy between Great Britain and her colonies.

By a W-farmer. New York, 1774. 14 The W-farmer refuted ; or a more impartial view of the dis

pute between Great Britain and the colonies. New York, 1775. 15 The association of the delegates of the colonies, versified. 1774, 16 A dialogue between a southern delegate and his spouse. 1774. 17 An address from congress to the inhabitants of Great Britain, Phila

delphia, 1775. 18 An Englishman's answer to the “ Address from congress to the peo

ple of Great Britain.” New York, 1775. 19 A declaration from congress, setting forth the causes and necessity of

their taking up arms. Philadelphia, 1775. 20 The petition and memorial of the assembly of Jamaica, to the king.

Philadelphia, 1775. 21 An address to the people of England, Ireland, and Scotland, on the

present important crisis. By Catharine Macauley. 3d edit. New

York, 1775. 22 The sentiments of a foreigner on the disputes of Great Britain with

America. Translated from the French. Philadelphia, 1775. 23 An examination of the mutual claims of Great Britain and the colo

nies; with a plan of accommodation. New York, 1775. 24 The political state of Massachusetts-bay. New York, 1775. 25 The poor man's advice to his poor neighbours, a ballad. New York,

1774.

26 The Americans roused, in a cure for the spleen; being the substance

of a conversation on the times. New York. 27 The patriots of North America, a sketch ; with notes. New York,

1775.
28 The triumph of the whigs; or t'other congress convened. New

York, 1775.
29 Advice to the counties of New York. 1774.
30 An alarm to the legislature of New York. 1775.

1346 31 Debates of the Robin-Hood society. New York, 1774.

32 The family compact ; or a discourse pointing out the advantages of

an union between Great Britain and her colonies. By Isaac Hunt.

Philadelphia, 1775. This volume the gift of Thomas Tellier. 1279 1 Pownall's memorial to the sovereigns of America. London, 1783.

3 Edmund Burke's speech on presenting to the house of commons A

plan for the better securing of the independence of parliament, &c.

4th edit. London, 1780. 1281 1 Observations on the American revolution. Published according to a

resolution of congress, by their committee. Philadelphia, 1779. 2 Webster's essay on free trade and finance. Philadelphia, 1779. 6 Phocion's letter to the citizens of New York, and Mentor's reply ;.

with Phocion's remarks on Mentor's reply. Philadelphia, 1784. 9 Burke's address to the freemen of South Carolina, on several subjects.

Philadelphia, 1783. 10 Burke's considerations on the order of Cincinnati. Philadelphia,

1783.. 11 Observations on “ Burke's considerations on the order of Cincinnati.”

Philadelphia, 1783. 1321 i Considerations on the provisional treaty with America, and the pre

liminary articles of peace with France and Spain. London, 1783. 2 Edmund Burke's speech on presenting to the house of commons a plan

for the better securing of the independence of parliament, &c. 4th

edit. London, 1780. 3 An address and recommendation to the states, by the United States in

congress assembled. Philadelphia, 1783. 4 The constitution of Pennsylvania; with the remarks of the council of

censors thereon. Philadelphia, 1784. 1322 1 An essay on the nature and principles of public credit. Lond. 1784.

2 A postscript to Dr. Price's pamphlet, on the state of the public debts

and finances. London, 1784. 1323 4 Day's reflections upon the peace, the East India bill, and the present

crisis. London, 1784. 1 Hertzberg's discourses, on the population of states in general; and

on the true riches of nations, the balance of commerce and that of power ; delivered before the royal academy of sciences and belles

lettres, at Berlin. Translated from the French. London, 1786. 1461 | Andrew's essay on republican principles, and on the inconveniencies

of a commonwealth in a large country and nation; with reflections

on the present situation of Great Britain. London, 1783. 2 Chalmer's opinions on interesting subjects of public law and com

mercial policy; arising from American independence. Lond. 1785. 3 A proposal for the liquidation of the national debt; the abolition of

tithes; and the reform of the church revenue. 3d edit. Lond. 1785. 1465 2 Dissertations on government; on the bank, and on paper money. By

Thomas Paine. Philadelphia, 1786. 3 Webster's reasons for repealing the act of the legislature of Pennsyl

vania, which took away the charter of the bank of North America.

Philadelphia, 1786. i Carey's account of the debates and proceedings of the general assem

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