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United States (official) hotel directory and rail road indicator: hotel red book, 1890. N. Y.,

Hotel Red Book and Directory Co., Grand Union Hotel, [1890.] 665 p. O. cl., $3.

Containing a complete and reliable list of hotels in the United States and Canada, including summer and winter resorts; also a list of hotels in London, Liverpool and Manchester. An important feature in connection with this directory is that it gives the names of railroads and water routes reaching or passing the town or city wherein the hotels are located, also the population, and whether a money order or telegraph office be located in the place, making it, as a book of reference, one of the most necessary, useful and convenient publication issued. For the use of hotel-men, guests, travellers, merchants, etc. Van Dyke, T. S. Millionaires of a day: an inside history of the great Southern California boom. N. Y., Fords, Howard & Huibert, 1890. C. 3+208 p. D. cl.. $1; pap.. 50 c.

A history of the great land "boom" of Southern California, which occurred about four years ago. Men who were millionaires one day were almost beggars the next. Mr. Van Dyke tells the story with much graphic humor. His knowledge of Southern California, every square mile

of which he has hunted over, and every portion and product of which he is familiar with, gives him a great advantage in treating his material; while his style is so crisp, his portrayals of human natu e so witty, his descriptions of the land so admirable, that-even if one has no interest in real estate "booms "-he will enjoy every single page of the book. Author of "Southern California," " Rifle, Rod and Gun in California," and "The Still Hunter."

*Villari, Pasquale. The life and times of Girolamo Savonarola; tr. by Luida Villari. New cheaper ed., rev. and enl. N. Y., Scribner & Welford, 1890. 2 v., il. and por., 8°, cl., $6. *Vinton, Arthur Dudley. Looking further backward: a novel. Albany, N. Y., Albany Book Co., 1890. 12, cl., $1; pap., 50 c. Walworth, Mrs. J. H. A strange pilgrimage: a novel. N. Y., Street & Smith, [1890.] c. 4-301 p. D. (Select ser., no. 62.) pap., 25 c. *Washington, G: The writings of George Washington, including his diary and correspondence; ed. by Worthington C. Ford. In 14 v. V. 5,

ORDER

ALBANY BOOK Co., Albany, N. Y. Vinton, Looking further backward. .50 c.; $1.00

AMERICAN TRACT SOC., N. Y.

6 and 7. N. Y., G: P. Putnam's Sons, 1890. ea., 8°, cl., $5. Webster, D: Webster's address at the laying of

the corner-stone of Bunker Hill monument; with a sketch of Webster's life. Bost., Ginn & Co., 1890. C. 5+23 p. D. (Annotated English classics.) pap., 10 c.

Welsh, Alfred H. A digest of English and American literature. Chic., S. C. Griggs & Co., 1890. c. 5+ 378 p. D. cl., $1.50.

Like his former books, this one grew out of Prof. Welsh's experience as a teacher. He prepared it because he believed that such a compendium would be useful to the student of English literature, and would facilitate the labors of the instructor. It is a condensed parallel view of history and literature in England and the United States from the time of the Roman invasion down to the present; and it may be used by the student in connection either with lectures by the teacher or with a text-book, such as the author's "Development of English literature and language."

West, Maria A. The romance of missions in the land of Ararat; with an introd. by Mrs. Charles. 7th ed. with map and index. Bost.. J. J. Arakelyan, 148 and 150 Pearl St., 1890. 133 p. 12°, cl., $1.50.

Westminster question book: international series, 1891: a manual for teachers and older scholars. V. 17. Phil., Presb. Bd. of Pub., [1890.] c. 3-192 p. map., T. bds., 15 c.

Contains the full lesson text of all the year's lessons, with the special temperance lessons; notes on the same; golden texts; home readings for every day of the year questions on lessons; catechism questions; practical teachings, etc.

Wheelock, Lucy and Mosher, Julia H., eds. Child songs, collected by Boston Primary Union. N. Y., Ward & Drummond, [1890.]

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Newman, Sayings

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Roh, Who and what is Christ?.

Haydn, American heroes on mission fields.

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Thomas Aquinas, Maxims.....

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Illinois, Appellate cts., Reports, v. 31 .... 3.50 Greene, Leon Pontifex .

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The Publishers Weekly.

FOUNDED BY F. LEYPOLDT.

OCTOBER 18, 1890.

The editor does not hold himself responsible for the views expressed in contributed articles or communications. All matter, whether for the reading-matter columns or our advertising pages, should reach this office not later than Wednesday noon, to insure insertion in the same week's issue.

In case of business changes, notification or card should be immediately sent to this office for entry under "Business Notes." New catalogues issued will also be mentioned when forwarded.

Publishers are requested to furnish title-page proofs and advance information of books forthcoming, both for entry in the lists and for descriptive mention. An early copy of each book published should be forwarded, to insure correctness in the final entry.

“Every man is a debtor to his profession, from the which, as men do of course seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves by way of amends to be a help thereunto."-LORD BACON.

DIGNITY IN LITERATURE.

A RECENT editorial in one of the "popular" monthly journals furnishes a most promising text for the subject of this paper. The editor, who is responsible for the article, professes a wide experience in journ alism, has a large circle of acquaintances among men and women of repute in letters, and claims that his magazine is a contribution to literature. In the September issue appears the following frank confession: 'Occasionally some stray reader who is not one of the regular journal family - writes, Why are you not more reserved and dignified on your editorial page as other editors, and use the plural instead of the personal pronoun?' Why, bless you, my friend, Reserve and Dignity are precisely the two qualities for which we have no room on our page. Reserve? Dignity? Why, are you reserved and dignified in your family? Well, the journal is only a larger family. The fact is, the great trouble with all our present literature is that it is altogether too reserved and dignified, and the writer removes himself too far from all his readers."

The forerunner and conclusion of this paragraph on the editorial page is an advertisement of the growing popularity and increased capabilities of the journal. That the editor, in seeking to make his magazine a family affair, establishes himself as the head of the household, and has won a justifiable amount of success in assuming such a responsibility. But some one outside of the family circle-an unbidden guest, perhaps

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has taken to task his parental conduct, and taxes him with lack of dignity and reserve. It is well to note how supremely he arises to the occasion, and how confidently he assures his flock that "dignity and reserve" are not home qualifications, and that most of the literature of the present day is overburdened with these characteristics. We beg to differ, not only with this latter ⚫ statement but with his conclusions. Manners make morals, and the lack of dignity, not only in the home but in a professional or commercial career, is the growing tendency of the day, to which may be traced much of the looseness of speech and many of the colloquialisms which, if not vulgar, are commonplace and uncouth. There are numerous illustrations of this, and it is almost directly the result of that absence of reserve which makes familiarity breed the contempt it deserves. Courteousness of manner, gentleness of speech, refinement of taste, are all dependent upon dignity and that amount of reserve which makes virtue and manliness superior to familiarity and flippancy.

In regard to literature it cannot be denied that there is a growing tendency to lower the tone and bring into popularity a school that has but little regard for the dignity and nobleness of its profession. Many papers find their way into print which, by a judicious amount of advertising, have cultivated a taste that is neither pure in tone nor honest in purpose. We do not intend to convey by this statement that they are necessarily immoral, but that in construction as well as qualification, they are not only loose and slovenly, but flippant and undignified, thereby working injury to the true mission of all genuine literature. Make your editorial page an advertising sheet, and, while you may increase your circulation, you will lower the tone of your journal. One of the most important factors of education is the editorial page. Its influence is as boundless as its power for either good or evil, and the editor who will undertake to inculcate the theory that dignity and reserve are qualifications that should be avoided in preparing a magazine for the home, is not a true disciple of literature. Who is responsible for this condition of affairs? The editor primarily, for he seeks to enlarge his circulation without regard to consequences. Commercial success is more to him than conviction and the lawful purpose of his vocation. Secondly, the author; for the quantity brings increased pecuniary results at the expense of quality. Much of the loose (and one might almost say slovenly) character of the work that passes as literature of the day is traceable to the fact that in looking for commercial success authors are willing to sacrifice their profession. This is not true of many authors, who can neither be bought nor tempted into lowering the tone of their calling by enterprising literary

syndicates. That was a trite remark of a prominent bookseller who said, "In these days literature has sunk to the level of advertising, and the art of advertising has arisen to the dignity of literature." And this leads us to say that the publishers and booksellers have an important part to play in reforming the present condition of affairs. They are educators, and with the publishers rests the task of cultivating, by the publication of wholesome and well-written books, a taste for genuine and healthy literature, and with the bookseller the work of making a market for this class of literature at the expense of that which is vicious and insipid. There is no occasion for discouragement or failure. A position so unstable, a taste so unnatural, is like a disease which requires heroic treatment. The physic will not be pleasant to take, but will in time, if properly applied, effect a cure.

The Saturday Review claims that "the Americans are not a bookbuying people." That may be, but then, are the Englishmen-unless they include the Mudies and the other proprietors of circulating libraries ?

THE United States of Brazil has responded to France's proposal of an international copyright treaty. Will the United States of America, which ought to have led in this movement, come next?

EXHIBITION OF MODERN MECHANICAL PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESSES. NOTHING in the wonderful history of photographic progress, which has been so strikingly rapid during the past few years, has been of greater importance than the development of what may be called, for want of a better term, the Photo-Mechanical Processes, which are so largely superseding wood engraving, steel engraving, and other pictorial methods. This subject is of great interest to the public, but particularly to all persons in any way interested in the production or use of pictorial illustrations, such as artists, authors, publishers of books, magazines and newspapers, printers and manufacturers whose products require illustration. For the past few years these processes have multiplied in number, have improved greatly in their results, and are every day assuming greater importance in both artistic and economical directions; yet it is a remarkable fact that in no exhibition have they been brought together for comparison and study. Beginning November 3, 1890, the New York Camera Club, of which David Williams is President, will give an exhibition in its rooms, 314 Fifth Avenue, of the work of the various establishments producing all classes of photogravure, photo-engraving, photo-lithographic and other mechanical photographic illustrations.

Admission will be by cards of invitation, which will be sent as generally as possible to photogpraphers, artists, authors, printers, manufacturers using illustrations, and in general to all persons likely to be interested in the subject.

A pamphlet will be distributed at the exhibition containing an essay giving a sketch, histor

ical and descriptive, of the different methods. A space, probably a page, will be set apart for each exhibitor, in which, on his own responsibility, he be will allowed to describe or recommend his process in his own way. No charge will be made for such insertion, and the pamphlets will be distributed free. Exhibits suitably framed of the committee in charge of the exhibition, and of proper character, subject to the approval will be hung upon the walls. Other exhibits, whether in books, albums, or on cards, will be displayed upon tables, for the examination of visitors. All frames must bear a neat label, which will be furnished by the club, giving the name of the exhibitor, the process by which made, and the title or explanation of the pictures. All other exhibits must be properly marked for identification.

There will be no charge whatever to exhibitors.

POE'S AL AARAAF.

MR. INGRAM in his "Life of Poe" says: "Poe is believed to have inspired one of his relatives, probably Mr George Poe, with a belief in his genius. This relative seems to have taken some interest in his nephew's welfare, and at this time wrote to the late John Neal to solicit his confidential opinion as to the youth's poetic abilities. The reply was not altogether unfavorable, and the consequence of it was that Poe wrote to Neal and proposed to publish a volume of poems dedicated to him." John Neal, at the time the above correspondence was going on, was editor of The Yankee a monthly literary magazine published in Boston. A reference to its pages seems to place the incidents above noted in a slightly different light, and this is the subject of an interesting portion of Mr. Woodberry "Life of Poe." In the September (1829) number of The Yankee, among the Answers to Correspondents," appears a notice to " E. A. P. of Baltimore," in which a proffered poem is criticised. The editor says it is "though nonsense, rather exquisite nonsense," etc. The whole of his remarks were reprinted in a recent number of the PUBLishers' WeekLY, and need not further be quoted. Three months later, the young poet, encouraged by the slight hint of praise conveyed in, the editor's sarcastic note, writes again, and his letter is accompanied by a recommendation from a friend of the editor's. This was possibly Mr. George Poe. Whoever it was, the effect of his intervention was to secure a respectful hearing of the budding author. To have a friend at court was always good—then, as even now in these latter days" of " sweetness and light." The article consists of the letter by Poe himself to the editor's friend, with brief comments by the editor. Poe says:

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I am young-not yet twenty-am a poet- if deep worship of all beauty can make me one-and wish to be so in the more common meaning of the word. I would give the world to embody one-half the ideas afloat in my imagination (by the way, do you remember - or did you ever read the exclamation of Shelley about Shakespeare? "What a number of ideas must have been afloat before such an author could arise!"). I appeal to you as a man that loves the same beauty which I adore the beauty of the natural blue sky and the sunshiny earth-there can be no tie more strong than that of brother for brotherit is not so much that they love one another, as that they both love the same parent their affections are always running in the same direction - the same channel - and cannot help mingling.

I am and have been from my childhood, an idler. It cannot therefore be said that

"I left a calling for this idle trade; A duty broke-a father disobeyed," for I have no father - nor mother.

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I am about to publish a volume of " Poems," the greater part written before I was fifteen. Speaking about heaven." the editor of The Yankee says, "He might write a beautiful, if not a magnificent poem "-(the first words of encouragement I ever remember to have heard). I am very certain that as yet I have not written either but that I can, I will take oath — if they will give me time. The poems to be published are Al Aaraaf,' "Tamerlane -one about four, and the other about three hundred lines, with smaller pieces. "Al Aaraaf" has some good poetry and much extravagance, which I have not had time to throw away. "Al Aaraaf" is a tale of another world—the star discovered by Tycho Brahe, which appeared and disappeared so suddenly - or, rather, it is no tale at all. I will insert an extract about the palace of its presiding deity, in which you will see that I have supposed many of the lost sculptures of our world to have flown (in spirit) to the star "Al Aaraaf "a delicate place more suited to their divinity.

Here follow long extracts both from " Al Aaraaf" and "Tamerlane." The faint praise of The Yankee did not damp Poe's ardor, and indeed he dedicated the poem " Tamerlane" in the "Al Aaraaf" volume to his critic. In the same number of The Yankee appears Whittier's poem, The Minstrel Girl."

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OBITUARY NOTES.

JAMES EDWIN THOROLD ROGERS, Professor of Political Economy at Oxford University, died at his Oxford residence on the 12th inst. He was born in Hampshire in 1824, and was educated at King's College School and at Magdalen Hall, Oxford. In 1857 he was a public examiner at Oxford. In 1859 he became Tooke Professor of Economic Science in King's College, London, and from 1862 to 1868 he was Professor of Political Economy at Oxford. He was for some years in holy orders, but retired under the provision of Mr. Bouverie's Clergy Relief bill. In 1874 he was an unsuccessful candidate for Scarborough, but in 1880 he was elected as a Liberal for Southwark. He was the author of 'A Manual of Political Economy," "Education in Oxford, its methods, its aids and its rewards,' "The Law of Settlement, a Cause of Crime," Aristotle's Ethics," "History of Agriculture and Prices in England from 1259 to 1792," "Six Centuries of Work and Wages," and edited the speeches of Richard Cobden and the various speeches of John Bright on questions of public policy. He was a frequent contributor to Notes and Queries.

PROFESSOR AUSTIN PHELPS, of Andover, father of Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, died at his Bar Harbor (Me.) cottage on the 13th inst., after a long illness. He was born at West Brookfield, Mass., January 7, 1820. In 1842 he became pastor of a Congregational church in Boston, serving in that capacity for six years, when he was appointed to the professorship of sacred rhetoric in Andover Theological Seminary, the duties of which he performed until 1879, a period of more than thirty years, during ten years of which he was President of the seminary. Since 1879 he had been proHis published works include

fessor emeritus.

To the Editor of the Publishers' Weekly : I USE odd moments of leisure-too few, alackin putting my five thousand books in order. Like some other poor folk, whom Heaven bless, I buy dearer books than I can well afford, and like to pay the binder a good price for fair work. From too many books I find it necessary to cut trade "ads," spoilt in some cases by "favorable notices" from the young ladies and gentlemen who write for the press. This done, I have to erase the marks made by booksellers and bookbinders, most of whom seem to have a grudge against clean title-pages and fly-leaves. The bookseller"The Still Hour" (1858), "The New Birth" who pastes his name in the books he charges a (1867), The Theory of Preaching" (1881), profit on, I avoid with limited success. Why "English Style in Public Discourse" (1883). will not our stanch friend, the PUBLISHERS' "My Study, and Other Essays" (1886). He was WEEKLY, tell publishers, booksellers and binders also the author of various published sermons and to dignify their trades by greater neatness and a addresses and edited two hymn-books. proper regard for the merchandise they try to commend. to buyers, most of whom have more taste than money? Booksellers and binders are sure to win a better place on earth and in heaven, if they will give up the bad practice of marring clean books with their private marks.

C. W. ERNST.

"WHY, Hannah, I'm astonished at your reading such a book," says Mr. Simpkins as he discovers his wife reading the latest literary effort, "In a Bad Man's Shadow." "The depravity of the times is showing itself in the demand for such books by respectable people-respectable people—and here I find you countenancing one of the worst by reading it. What did you do? order it openly, I suppose, at Loring's or Herrick's, that they may know that we read such books in this family! Oh, you bought it at a stall in Washington St.! Well, I'm thankful you had that much decency. Let me see the book, to find out how much corrupt trash you can enjoy "and the evening lamps are lighted and the children have their tea and are sent to bed; the dinner is announced and waits while the victorious Mr. Simpkins finishes "In a Bad Man's Shadow." -Boston Saturday Gazette.

CHARLES H. Dow, formerly with Gould & Lincoln, and for the past fifteen years bookdied October 7. Mr. Dow will be remembered keeper at T. Y. Crowell & Co.'s Boston house, as a pleasant acquaintance and warm-hearted friend, as well as faithful servant.

NOTES ON AUTHORS. BENJAMIN HILL, the son of "Ben" Hill, is writing a biography of his father.

ANOTHER Southern biography soon to be published is that of Robert Toombs, prepared by the editor of The Augusta Chronicle.

"OWEN INNSLEY," the author of a clever book of poems, published some time ago, has in the press another book, " Penelope's Web; an Episode of Sorrento."

THE editor to whom Cardinal Newman entrusted for publication his letters written while the sister of his brother-in-law. in the Church of England is Miss Anne Mozley,

MADDISON MORTON, the venerable author of "Box and Cox" (dear to the heart of every amateur actor) and many other amusing farces, is

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