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Tiffany, Esther B. The spirit of the Pine; il. by W: S. Tiffany. Bost., L: Prang & Co., [1890.] C. 12 p. O. bds., $1.

A pretty Christmas masque with three full-page photogravures.

Tsar (The) and his people; or, social life in Russia. N. Y., Harper, 1891 [1890.] c. 4+435 p. il. O. cl., $3.

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A series of brilliant articles, handsomely illustrated, on Russia and the Russians. The Vicomte Eugene Melchior de Vogüé furnishes two articles. “Social life in Russia and "Through the Caucasus.' By Theodore Child we have "Palatial Petersburg." "The fair of Nijnii-Novgorod," "Holy Moscow," "The Kremlin and Russian art, "Modern Russian art.""Russian bronzes " are treated by Clarence Cook, and "A Russian village" is the subject of a paper by Vassili Verestchagin. The i. are extremely fine, having been made by T. de Thulstrup, and others from photographs of scenery, Russian pictures, bronzes, etc. The cover is in a bright yellow cloth, with the Russian coat-of-arms, in black and red and blue and silver, ornamenting the front cover.

Tupper, Edith Sessions. By whose hand? N. Y., United States Book Co., [1890.] c. '89. 4135 p. D. (American author's ser., no. 22.) pap., 50 c.

Valentine, Mrs. ed.

The old, old fairy tales; with col. il, and woodcuts. N. Y., F: Warne & Co., 1890. 9+564 p. O. cl., $3.

A handsome volume of the old fairy tales, compiled from Madame D'Aulnoy, Perrault and others. With a profusion of pictures.

Van Rensselær, Mrs. J: King. The Devil's picture books: a history of playing cards. N. Y., Dodd, Mead & Co., [1890.] c. col. il. O. cl., $5.

207 P.

A book on playing cards, the information being in a large measure derived from Les Cartes à jouer by Paul la Croix; "Facts and speculations about playing-cards," by Mr. Chatto; "The history of playing cards," by the Rev. E. Taylor; and "The history of playing-cards," by Mr. Singer. These books are now out of print, and difficult to obtain; hence many readers will be glad to find their interesting facts in an obtainable and attractive form. The cards of all nations are described and illustrated. There are 16 full-page plates in color, and many il. in black-and-white.

*Virginia. Supreme ct. of appeals. Reports of

cases, by G: W. Hansbrough. V. 85; from June 6, 1888-Apr. 11, 1889. Richmond. J. H. O'Bannon, supt. pub. pr., 1890. c. 31+ 1098 p. O. shp.. $2.50.

White House (The) gift book. N. Y., Worthington Co., [1890.] c. 3-192 p. por., il. Q. bds., $1.25.

Pictures and short poems and stories. Opens with portraits and brief biographies of the presidents.

Whittier, J: Greenleaf. Whittier gems; il. by L: K. Harlow. Bost., S: E. Cassino, [De Wolfe, Fiske & Co.,] 1889. c. '88. no paging, por., obl. D. cl., or, antique pap., tied with ribbons, $2.50.

Six photo-etchings and six pages of selections from Whittier with a portrait.

Winter, J: Strange, [pseud. for Mrs. H. E. V. Stannard.] He went for a soldier.

N. Y.,

United States Book Co., [1890.] c. 144 P. (Lovell's Westminster ser., no. 19.) pap., 25 c. Wood, Helen F., Waithman, Helen Maud, and Dawson, Ethel. The beautiful world; and other poems. N. Y., E. P. Dutton & Co., [1890.] no paging, il. obl. D. cl., $3.

Pictures and poems in monotints, printed by Nister. Wood, Helen J., Hoyer, M. A., Butt, Geraldine, [and others.] Jack Frost and other stories; with color drawings by J: Lawson, and monochrome vignettes, by R. A. Bell. N. Y., E. P. Dutton & Co., [1890.] no paging, O. bds., $1.50.

Full page pictures in colors of children at play, animals, etc., with many small pictures in black-and-white, adorn an exceptionally attractive text. A book for little children. Printed by Nister.

Worthington's annual: a series of interesting stories, biographies, papers on natural history for the young, 1891. N. Y., Worthington Co., [1890.] 208 p. il. Q. bds., $1.25.

Young England's nursery tales; il. by Constance Haslewood. N. Y., F: Warne & Co., [1890.] 2-80 p. D. bds.. 75 c.

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Cinderella," ," "Puss in Boots," "Jack and the Beanstalk," Tom Thumb" and other well-known fairy tales, beautifully illustrated in colors.

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Old father time

2.00

Daudet, Kings in Exile...

.$1.50;

2.25

Wood and others, Jack Frost....

THE EVANGELICAL PUB. Co., Chic.

Marshall, Shakespeare and his birthplace. 3.00 Swift, Gulliver's travels.

The beautiful world.....

Needham, Books of the Bible in rhyme..

The gospel alphabet....

1.00

1.50

ROBERTS BROS., Bost.

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HARPER & BROS., N. Y.

James, Dictionary of the English and German language, 31st ed., rev.

2.50

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Moore, Lalla Rookh, vignette ed...$1.50; Pollard, Two little tots.

3.00

1.00

2.50

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Tsar (The) and his people....

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Che Publishers Weekly.

FOUNDED BY F. LEYPOLDT.

NOVEMBER 8, 1890.

The editor does not hold himself responsible for the views expressed in contributed articles or communications.

All matter, whether for the reading matter columns or our advertising pages, should reach this office not later than Wednesday noon, to insure insertion in the same week's issue.

In case of business changes, notification or card should be immediately sent to this office for entry under "Business Notes." New catalogues issued will also be mentioned when forwarded.

Publishers are requested to furnish title-page proofs and advance information of books forthcoming, both for entry in the lists and for descriptive mention. An early copy of each book published should be forwarded, to insure correctness in the final entry.

“Every man is a debtor to his profession, from the which, as men do of course seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves by way of amends to be a help thereunto."-LORD BACON.

THE CHRISTMAS TRADE.

THE bookseller, of all wise business men, must take time by the forelock-especially in the matter of stocking up for the Christmas trade. By this time of the year every bookseller who contemplates making the most of the harvest that the Fall and Winter produces, ought to have his shelves fully stocked with everything that his constituency may be likely to call for, so that when the demand is made upon him he may fill it at once, and not put off his customer until he can get the needed article from New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago or San Francisco. He must be a good "old stand-by" indeed, who will patiently wait until what he wants comes creeping along by cheap freight or through other uncertain channels of transportation. In ninetynine cases out of a hundred there will be a dozen or more other houses who will have what is wanted-especially the department shops. The bookseller must never forget that it is with what he sells as it is with the druggist's wares-when a thing is wanted, it is wanted badly, and at

once.

It is with the publishers a matter of a year or more to lay out their work for the holiday season, and the bookseller in his turn must inform himself thoroughly months before the holiday shopper invades his establishment. We propose, as usual, to issue our Christmas number as early this month as the material can be got ready. This, we hope, will serve the double purpose of giving a cue to the bookseller of what is most

likely to be in demand, and of giving him plenty of time to get this issue, with his imprint, well distributed among his customers.

From year to year, unfortunately, the holiday season is compressed into narrower and narrower limits, and therefore is more brisk while it lasts. Every year, so far, jobbers and publishers have been overwhelmed with telegraphic orders which, as Christmas-day came nearer and nearer, they found it absolutely impossible to fill. In this way not a few dealers have lost valuable sales. If they measure their market carefully and buy wisely they are not likely, even on large and varied orders, to litter up their shelves with what will be " plugs" next year.

ON THE PHILOSOPHY OF BUYING
BOOKS.

"The Listener" in the Boston Transcript. HAVING been tempted the other day to buy an excellent old edition of Rousseau's works which was going very cheap, and having resisted the temptation on grounds which were satisfactory to himself, the Listener was led to meditate a little on the philosophy of buying books. It occurred to him at the time that possibly the subject had been meditated on before, but he boldly proceeded just the same. The point of his meditations was this: Unless one is a book collector, an amateur of editions (and if one sets out to collect books he must needs be sure of living a thousand years if he desires to do it well), there century, except as to the great masters, like is little use of buying authors out of one's own Shakespeare, and the indispensable classics. Take an author like Rousseau, for instance. Jean Jacques was great, and he helped, with a handful of others, to remake the world-to fashion it over again. But e'er this time the essential part of Jean Jacques has been imbedded in the thought of the time. It has become a part of everybody. One does not take up his daily newspaper, or even his weekly Independent or Christian Register, without reading Rousseau, though the people who write those papers may never have read a word of him directly. What is the use, then, of buying his books? They have done their work.

So as to a score of other authors whose books one often sees ranged in lines, like tombs at Mount Auburn, in gentlemen's private libraries. Putting aside considerations of bibliology, which are of interest to but few people, it is reasonable to say that one's bookbuying should be, after the poets and the classics of the language are fairly represented on one's shelves, confined to the real authors of the time-to the men and women who are saying something new, or saying something old in such a way as to make it take a new hold on people's thoughts. Read enough of the reviews and of book news to know what is really significant in the books that are appearing, and buy along those lines as fast as you are able to read thoughtfully the books you buy. Obtain your books as far as you can in editions printed in the author's own country; they are more representative of the personality of the author, and him. But of course you will not buy a book in a help you to get on even terms of sympathy with foreign language if it has been translated into English, unless you are able to read it without

PONDENCE.

translating it to yourself as you go along. To do JAEGER'S LIFE OF IBSEN: A CORRESthat would be, as Emerson said, like insisting upon swimming across the Charles River instead of coming over on the bridge.

One word more as to buying authors in editions printed in their own country: One would not, of course, buy an American author in an English

edition; that would be an affectation. To see our

To the Editor of the New York Times:

I beg to inform you that the "Life of Henrik Ibsen,' just published by William Heinemann, London, and Lovell, New York, has never been authorized by its author, Henry Jaeger, who in a

The sole authorization was given to me in January, and I hold the American copyright. My manuscript was completed several weeks ago and in the hands of my publisher, who, however, returned it when the book appeared.

own authors in English type, printing and bind-letter just received pronounces the undertaking ing always has the effect upon the Listener of a "literary piracy," and has given me the permission, in his and my own name, publicly to hearing an American speak with a British accent. announce and denounce that fact. And if this has such an effect, why should he buy an English author in an American edition, when the English edition can be ordered and obtained in a month through any bookseller? Besides, it is undeniable that English books as a rule are much better specimens of the book-makers' art than ours are. It may be wounding to our national pride that it is so, but it is so. Furthermore, a great many of the most valuable English books are never reprinted on this side. Reprinting is a matter of the prospect of making money; and it is not always the good book which sells, as everybody knows who has read more than a dozen books. For instance, Walter Pater's "Marius the Epicurean" is a greater book-the book of a greater thinker and a better writer-than "Robert Elsmere;" but it has never been reprinted in America. And of course a cheap and dirty reprint of any book does not deserve a place upon a thoughtful person's book-shelves.

There seems to be no good reason why one should care to keep forever all the books one buys. A certain proportion of one's books will, anyway, turn out to be failures, so far as influencing the mind and occupying a place in one's intellectual affections are concerned. When your bookshelves begin to overflow, a judicious culling should be made. Select a dozen or two of the books you like least and need least, carry them to the dealer in second-hand books, and get for them as many as you can make him give you of the books you do want. Mere novelty should not be consulted in this transaction. Perhaps a book that is twenty-five years old has only just swum into your ken. Perhaps it will be a classic that you want. But at any rate, your bookshelves, culled and recruited in this manner, will always represent the present stage of your intellectual, moral and æsthetic development; they will, much more than an indiscriminate collection, including everything you have ever bought, represent you, and be a proof to you of your own existence." Among the books you keep always by you, no doubt, will be some that you inherited, or bought when you were fifteen years old; those are of the books that stick, and are a legitimate part of you. The book you buy to-day, on the other hand, may come to overtop all the rest. Perhaps you may pack off to the second-hand dealer the real intellectual pearl of your collection; no matter

"What care I how fair she be,
If she be not fair to me?"

You may not always be just or wise in your judgments; but you have at least the satisfaction, in buying books in this way, that you are true to your own best and most studious self.

SALESMEN who are good listeners are usually good observers, and consequently they grow intelligent. If a point can be made clear at all, it is all the clearer by brevity, and sensible people prefer evidence to eloquence.

In the interest of international copyright, and as a plea for justice, please publish this in your esteemed paper. I remain, gentlemen, yours very HENRIK G. PETERSEN, M.D. truly. VIENNA, Sunday, 19th of October, 1890. 3 Garelli Gasse IX.

NEW YORK, November 5, 1890.

Editor of New York Times:

DEAR SIR: I notice in your issue of November 3, in a letter headed "Pirated," and signed by Henrik G. Petersen, M.D., a statement that Jaeger's Life of Ibsen" has been issued by Lovell.

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Dr. Petersen is evidently in error, as I have not published such a work, nor has it been issued by my successors, The United States Book Co. Yours very truly, JOHN W. LOVell.

THACKERAY LETTERS AND MSS.

From the Pall Mall Gazette.

There is to be sold at Sotheby's, on November 26, an important collection of manuscripts and autograph letters by Thackeray and Rossetti. The MSS., autograph letters and drawings by Thackeray belonged to the late Mr. J. F. Boyes, a schoolfellow of the great novelist's at the Charterhouse, with whom he corresponded throughout life in terms of the most intimate friendship.

It

The MSS. include "Horace Carthusianae," an original unpublished manuscript in verse, 7 pp. 4to, written by Thackeray when monitor at the Charterhouse, at seventeen years of age. consists of a poem of 100 lines, dated Charterhouse, Thursday, December 4, 1828, and presents a picture of the procedure of the school from early morning to bed time, and fully authenti. cates the reputation attached to the head master (Dr. Russell, see Moments with Thackeray") for severity. The interest of the MS. is increased by a series of footnotes explaining passages in the text, indicated by asterisks, and showing the customs of the school, and original manuscript Latin verses (sixteen lines) with his signature, W. M. Thackeray, I p. 4to, with a large caricature pen-and-ink drawing on the reverse, of an invalid attended by a doctor and nurse. The verses show him in an amorous mood, and as the writing appears to be contemporary with letters written from the Charterhouse in 1826, it is highly probable that the Clara" referred to was Joseph Carne's sister, the supposed "Star of Harrow" of his Holiday Song," which is also offered for sale, and which was written when at the Charterhouse at fifteen years of age. It is a good specimen of Thackeray's youthful bantering muse, commencing :

Now let us dance and sing
While Carthusian bells do ring;
Joy twangs the fiddle-string,

And Freedom blows the flute.
Tiddle dum and tiddle di,
What a joke for you and I.
Dulce domum! let us cry,

Charterhouse adieu.

Various among his schoolfellows are mentioned by name, as Joseph Carne, Edward Langdale Smith, Hudson, Oare, Hastings and George Shakespear; while one verse, the most interesting of them all, proves Thackeray's susceptibility to female charms even at that early age.

runs:

Queen of Beauty! Star of Harrow !
Thou hast shot through heart and marrow,
And stricken Makepeace with thy arrow
In the head and brain.

It

my life. On the mantel of the room was a col lection of dog-eared, paper-covered novels of the cheap and penny dreadful order. They were the works of authors whose names were unknown to me, although, doubtless, they would be familiar to readers of weekly story papers. Of course, we never read papers of that kind. I suppose I am as skilful as most men of my line, whose business is getting at the merits of works of fic

tion. I went over the entire list of books-there might have been half a hundred or more—and selected six, by as many different authors. I was amazed at the promise which at least four of them showed. All the novels had been written down to the multitude, but the dramatic force, originality and ability in writing dialogue which the writers showed gave the keenest promise of future power. Of course, these books were writThackeray's Schrevelius' Greek Lexicon, old ten to keep the authors alive, and equally, of leather binding, is likewise offered for sale. It course, they could not come into competition contains his name in a boyish hand; the flywith the works of the French, German and Engleaves (seven pages) are covered with sketches, lish masters, whose efforts have been nursed and portraits and scraps of verse; and thirty of the liberally paid for by their appreciative countrypages bear slight but humorous sketches on the men. The writers of this cheap literature are margins, by Thackeray, being portraits of There is no school-fellows and others (including a head of kept to their level by an iron rod. chance of their mounting. The very instant Napoleon I., and one believed to be a portrait of they improve their style they lose their hold on Dr. Russell, headmaster in the Charterhouse in the ignorant readers, and they come into compeThackeray's school days), caricatures, etc., etc. tition with foreign novelists; hence they are His "Froissart's Chronicles" bears on the fly-confined to depicting local life for every-day peoleaves seven clever pencil sketches, one (full-page) plé. There is no question about the waste of being a joust between an English knight and a French knight, the remainder being knights in ability and genius which our system encourages." armor, horses caparisoned for the tournament,

etc.

There is also an album containing twenty-two very clever original pen and-ink and pencil sketches, by W. M. Thackeray, made by him while at the Charterhouse, and principally of a humorous character, some bearing inscriptions in his autograph, and including the following subjects: Hector and Andromache (burlesque); Combats between Brigands, Turks and Soldiers; Country Fair; The Minstrel Boy; Maltese Carriage; Death of Marmion (burlesque); Prize for English verse at the Charterhouse (satirical); Brutus (burlesque), etc., etc. The sketches were given to J. F. Boyes while at the Charterhouse.

LACK OF INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT
LOWERING THE STANDARD OF

AMERICAN AUTHORSHIP.

'IN all of the talk about the need of an international copyright," the reader of a well-known New York publishing house said to a Sun reporter, "the most important phase of the whole matter has received scant attention. I found my self obliged the other day to wait three hours one morning, in the reception-room of a doctor on the east side of town. A servant of mine, to whom all of the household were devoutedly attached, had grown ill, and she insisted on going to the east side doctor's house, instead of allowing me to call in our family physician. We drove over there, and took our place in turn with the score or two other visitors who were scattered around the big waiting-room. I had a short conference with the doctor when I went in, and he informed me that it was impossible for him to make any distinction with his patients. He must see them in turn. I had not brought a morning paper with me, although reading has been the habit of

NOTES ON AUTHORS.

FRIEDERICH SPIELHAGEN has fully recovered his health and is preparing a drama" In eiserner Zeit," to be performed shortly at Frankfort a-m, Vienna, and Berlin.

M. TAINE has just finished correcting the proofs of another volume in his series on the Origines de la France Contemporaine. It is the first volume of his "Le Régime Moderne," and deals with the Napoleonic epoch.

GEORGE BANCROFT, the venerable historian, in a conversation with a friend, recently said: "I have laid my work upon the shelf, and can now only wait for the future summons. Literary effort has passed beyond my powers. I can do no more, so I must accept the common lot of humanity. I enjoy taking a retrospective view of the events of the long past, but, dimmed by the infirmities of age, the scene is without the sharp lines of detail which younger faculties of mind bring out in interesting relief." Mr. Bancroft is again comfortably established in his Washington home, amid pleasant surroundings, and is in full He can still enjoy possession of his senses. many of the pleasures of life, but the work of life for him is over.

PERSONAL NOTES

JOHN DURIE, one of the oldest booksellers in Canada, and his wife, celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their wedding day a week ago, at Bytown. Many friends called on the happy couple at their residence, to offer congratulations. A most pleasing incident was a visit from the ladies of the board of management of the Protestant Orphans' Home, who presented Mrs. Durie with an address read by the recording secretary, accompanied by a beautiful gift of silver.

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