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A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,

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ALBANY, March 26, 1918.

To the Senate:

I hereby nominate as a manager of the New York State Training School for Girls, for a term to expire the first Tuesday in February, 1925, Annie Winsor Allen of White Plains, whose term of office as such manager has expired.

(Signed)

CHARLES S. WHITMAN. Mr. Slater moved that the said nomination be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,
ALBANY, March 26, 1918.

To the Senate:

I hereby nominate as managers of the Syracuse State Institution for Feeble-Minded Children Jessie B. Durston of Syracuse, for a term to expire the first Tuesday in February, 1920, to succeed Ralph S. Bowen, resigned; Ida Strauss Marshall of Syracuse, for a term to expire the first Tuesday in February, 1922, to succeed Walter W. Cheney, resigned; Clara A. Walters of Syracuse, for a term to expire the first Tuesday in February, 1923, to succeed Edward S. Van Duyn, resigned.

(Signed)

CHARLES S. WHITMAN.

Said nominations were referred to the committee on finance.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,

ALBANY, March 26, 1918.

To the Senate:

I hereby nominate as a manager of the Brooklyn State Hospital Charles Partridge of Brooklyn, whose term of office as such manager has expired.

(Signed)

CHARLES S. WHITMAN.

Mr. Murphy moved that the said nomination be confirmed. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

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To the Senate:

I hereby nominate as a trustee of the New York State Hospital for the Treatment of Incipient Pulmonary Tuberculosis, for a term to expire the first Tuesday in February, 1925, Rev. Chrisenberry A. Ritchie of Binghamton, whose term of office as such trustee has expired.

(Signed)

Mr. Hill moved that the said nomination be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

CHARLES S. WHITMAN.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,
ALBANY, March 26, 1918.

To the Senate:

I hereby nominate as a manager of the Binghamton State Hospital Benjamin F. Weldon of Binghamton, whose term of office as such manager has expired.

(Signed)

CHARLES S. WHITMAN.

Mr. Hill moved that the said nomination be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,

ALBANY, March 26, 1918.

To the Senate:

I hereby nominate as a manager of the Buffalo State Hospital Elizabeth Drake Hazel of Buffalo, to succeed Phillip G. Schaefer, whose term of office as such manager has expired.

(Signed)

CHARLES S. WHITMAN.

Said nomination was referred to the committee on finance.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,

ALBANY, March 26, 1918.

To the Senate:

I hereby nominate as a manager of the Utica State Hospital Elizabeth Kellogg of New York Mills, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Lizzie Wilhelm Constable.

(Signed)

CHARLES S. WHITMAN.

Said nomination was referred to the committee on finance.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,
ALBANY, March 27, 1918.

To the Senate:

I hereby nominate as Health Officer for the Port of New York Leland S. Cofer, M. D., of New York city, whose term of office has expired.

Mr. Sage moved that the said nomination be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK- EXECUTIVE CHAMBER.

To the Legislature:

The question of so-called "daylight saving" deserves your serious and prompt attention. I am informed that an act entitled "An act to save daylight and to provide standard time for the United States" has been passed by Congress which provides as follows:

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"Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled that, for the purpose of establishing the Standard time of the United States, the territory of Continental United States shall be divided into five zones in the manner hereinafter provided. The standard time of the first zone shall be based on the mean astronomical time of the seventy-fifth degree of longitude west from Greenwich; that of the second zone on the ninetieth degree; that of the third zone on the one hundred and fifth degree; that of the fourth zone on the one hundred and twentieth degree, and that of the fifth zone, which shall include only Alaska, on the one hundred and fiftieth degree. That the limits of each zone shall be defined by an order of the Interstate Commerce Commission, having regard for the convenience of commerce and the existing junction points and division points of common carriers engaged in commerce between the several States with foreign nations, and such order may be modified from time to time.

"Section 2. That within the respective zones created under the authority hereof the standard time of the zone shall govern the movement of all common carriers engaged in commerce between the several States or between a State and any of the territories of the United States or between a State or the territory of Alaska and any of the insular possessions of the United States or any foreign country. In all statutes, orders, rules, and regulations relating to the time of performance of any act by any officer or department of the United States, whether in the legislative, executive, or judicial branches of the Government, or relating to the time within which any rights shall accrue or determine, or within which any act shall or shall not be performed by any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, it shall be understood and intended that the time shall be the United States standard time of the zone within which the act is to be performed.

"Section 3. That at 2 o'clock ante-meridian of the last Sunday in March of each year the standard time of each zone shall be advanced one hour, and at 2 o'clock ante-meridian of the last Sunday in October in each year the standard time of each zone shall, by the retarding of one hour, be returned to the mean astronomical time of the degree of longitude governing said zone, sa that between the last Sunday in March at 2 o'clock ante-meridian and the last Sunday in October at 2 o'clock ante-meridian in each year the standard time in each zone shall be one hour in advance of the mean astronomical time of the degree of longitude governing each zone, respectively.

"Section 4. That the standard time of the first zone shall be known and designated as United States Standard Eastern Time; that of the second zone shall be known and designated as United States Standard Central Time; that of the third zone shall be known and designated as United States Standard Mountain Time; that of the fourth zone shall be known and designated as United States Standard Pacific Time, and that of the fifth zone shall be known and designated as United States Standard Alaska Time."

It is my understanding that the United States adopted an arbitrary standard time in 1883 on the initiative of the American Railway Association for the purpose of securing uniformity in the operation and connection of their trains and at noon of November 18, 1883, the telegraphic time signals sent out daily from the Naval Observatory at Washington, were changed to the new system according to which the meridians of seventy-five degrees, ninety degrees, one hundred and five degrees, and one hundred and twenty degrees west from Greenwich became the meridians of Eastern, Central, Mountain and Pacific standard time respectively.

Theoretically, the divisions should be half be half way between the meridians but for general convenience the railroads changed their time at the ends of railroad divisions so that Eastern Standard Time is used from the Atlantic Coast to an irregular line through Buffalo, Salamanca, Pittsburg and other places to the south. The same applies to the dividing lines between the other divisions. The Interstate Commerce Commission, which has been empowered by the new federal act to define the limits of the zones, has indicated that for the present at least the existing zones will be retained.

While standard time has not heretofore been established throughout the United States by act of Congress, the State of New York has provided by statute for standard time throughout the State for the regulation of courts and public officers and legal.

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