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BURKE

ON

CONCILIATION

WITH THE

COLONIES

EDITED BY

CORNELIUS BEACH BRADLEY

PROFESSOR OF RHETORIC IN THE

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

ALLYN AND BACON

BOSTON
NEW YORK

CHICAGO
ATLANTA

SAN FRANCISCO

HARVARD
GOLLEGE

LIBRARY

COPYRIGHT, 1920,
BY CORNELIUS B. BRADLEY.

Norwood Press
J. S. Cushing Co. — Berwick & Smith Co.

Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.

PREFACE

The speech on Conciliation with the Colonies, delivered nearly one hundred and fifty years ago, is read to-day in American schools with the interest which attaches to a current day topic. It is not merely that the subject is one which naturally attracts American readers from its association with an important crisis in our history. It is that Burke's arguments have still a living interest in their application to the great questions which to-day confront not only England but every government, and even every private enterprise which has to deal with large problems of administration.

The following quotations, taken at random from Burke's speech, would fit readily into the discourse of the statesmen of any of the world powers who are seeking to bring about the hoped-for universal peace and understanding which were the objects of the Great War.

The proposition is peace.
Peace implies reconciliation.
Reconciliation does in a manner always imply concession.
I pardon something to the spirit of liberty.

The use of force alone is but temporary. Conciliation failing, force remains; but force failing, no further hope of conciliation is left.

The question is not whether their spirit deserves praise or blame, but what in the name of God shall we do with it?

Obedience is what makes government, not the names by which it is called.

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