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Prepositions

36

Conjunctions

37

Interjections

ibid

CHAPTER II.- The Nature and Character of the Use which

gives Law to Language

ibid

Language mainly a Species of Fashion

38

Use, or the Custom of Speaking, the sole original standard of

Conversation, as far as respects the Expression; and the
Custom of Writing the chief standard of Style

ibid

Reputable Use

39

Vulgarisms

ibid

Authors of Reputation

40

National Use

ibid

The English Language, properly so called

41

Professional Dialects

ibid

National Use, as opposed to Foreign

ibid

Present Use

42

CHAPTER III.—The Nature and Use of verbal Criticism,

with its principal Rules or Canons, by which in all our Decis-

ions, we ought to be directed

44

Good Use

ibid

The divided Use

ibid

Canon the First, when Use is divided as to any particular Word

or Phrase

45

Canon the Second. In doubtful cases, regard ought to be had,

in our decisions, to the analogy of the Language

46

Canon the Third, prefers what is most agreeable to the Ear ibid
Canon the Fourth, allows simplicity to determine our choice ibid
Canon the Fifth, prefers what is most conformable to ancient
Usage

ibid

Every thing favoured by good Use, is not on that Account

worthy to be retained

47

Canon the Sixth, points out such Words and Phrases as merit

degradation

48

Criteria, by which we may discriminate the objectionable

Words from all others

ibid

Canon the Seventh, points to Words that require dismission 50

Canon the Eighth, respects Words become obsolete

ibid

Canon the Ninth, enables us to detect solecisms and idiomatical

phrases

51

Canon the Tenth, regards the Suppression of a significant

Term, which hath come into good Use

52

CHAPTER IV.-Of Grammatical Purity

53

Pure English Composition

ibid

The reproach of barbarism may be incurred in three different

ways : 1st.. By the Use of Words entirely obsolete ; 2ndly.

By the Use of Words entirely new ; or, 3dly. By new Form-

ations and Compositions, from simple and primitive Words in

present Use

By the Use of obsolete Words

ibid

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Of all the Figures of Speech, none comes so near to painting as

Metaphor

149

Metaphors must be suited to the Nature of the Subject of which

we treat

150

The Choice of Ohjects from whence Metaphors, and other

Fgures, are to be drawn

Metaphors drawn from Objects of Resemblance, which is the

Foundation of the Metaphors, be clear and perspicuous, not

far-fetched, nor difficult to discover

152

In the Conduct of Metaphors, we are never to jumble meta-

phorical and plain Language together

153

Never make two different Metaphors meet on one Ohject 154

Addison's Rule for examining the Propriety of Metaphors 156

Metaphors must not be too far pursued

CHAPTER 11.-Comparisons or Similes

159

The Difference between Comparisons or Similes

ibid

All Comparisons may be reduced to the following Heads 160

Explaining Comparisons

161

Embellishing Comparisons

162

Comparisons employed to elevate or depress the principal ob-

ject

163

Comparisons should not be instituted between Objects, the Re-

semblance of which is either obscure, faintz or remote 164

Comparisons should not be deduced from Objects which rise

much above the primary Object

165

Comparisons destitute of dignity, transfer insignificance to the

principal Object

ibid

Comparisons are censurable when they prompt Feelings dis.

cordant with the aim of the principal Object, or when they

suggest Sentiments painful or disagreeable

166

Comparisons should never be founded on Resemblances which

are too obvious and familiar, nor on those which are imagin-

ary

167

Extended Similes may be introduced with advantage on various

Occasions

ibid

Improper Occasions on which circumstantial Similes make

Their Appearance

169

Short Siniles appear in the most passionate Scenes

170

CHAPTER IV. -Personification

171

Descriptive Personification

172

Passionate Personification

174

The English Language possesses a singular Advantage in

marking Personification

176

A capital Error in Personification, is to deck the Figure with

ibid

Personifications should

not be introduced when the subject of

Discussion is destitute of dignity

177

CHAPTER V.-Allegory

178

Allegory ornamental

Allegories communicate Instruction

ibid

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